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AUSTRALIA 2013
FIP International Stamp Exhibition 
Melbourne, Australia, 10 -15th May 2013

Australia will be hosting a World Exhibition to commemorate the
Centenary of the Kangaroo stamp issued as the first Commonwealth postage stamp.
Australia 2013 will be an FIP International Stamp Exhibition to be held in Melbourne Australia, 
from 10 - 15 May 2013 at the
Exhibition Buildings, Carlton, Melbourne
Dealers Attending Australia 2013
Australian 2013
-1476 days
To go

 

Major Sponsor

KANGAROO & MAP STAMPS:

An Advertisement for Australia


For more information on Dealers attending the show 
Please visit APTA website

Richard Breckon

When Australia’s six colonies federated to form the Commonwealth of Australia on January 1 1901, philatelists looked forward to the imminent release of a single series of Australian Commonwealthstamps. It was not to be. Not even a temporary issue of state stamps overprinted with the Commonwealth’s initials “CA” was arranged (as had been initially proposed). For 12 years after Federation, state stamps continued to be current, and for most of this period the stamps remained valid for postage only in the state of origin. For example, a Melbournian visiting Sydney could not use a Victorian stamp to send a letter home. Six colonial postal administrations had become one Federal postal authority, but six separate issues of stamps continued to be produced.

The Postmaster-General’s Department had decided in 1901 that state stamps would have to be continued for at least several years because of Section 89 of the Australian Federal Constitution. This clause specified that state governments were to be reimbursed the surplus revenue of former colonial departments that had been transferred at Federation to Commonwealth control for a period of at least five years. The “book-keeping clause”, as it was known, meant that the postal systems in each state had to be run independently of each other, so that the surplus revenue could be calculated accurately. To this end, separate supplies of state stamps were maintained for use exclusively by each state.

(To read Full Article click here)



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